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*New Article: The Formula of Love* Login/Join
 
Picture of Skin Biology
Location: Skin Biology in Bellevue, Washington - USA
Registered: 22 June 2004
Posts: 4865
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New article "Formula of Love" by Dr. Loren Pickart, was printed in the magazine Cosmetics & Medicine (Russia), April 2005

Here is an excerpt:

"Let’s imagine a medieval dancing couple — beautiful girl in a long dress and her handsome partner. Her young body is hot from dancing, and in agreement with laws of physics, warm air between the body and clothes rises toward the opening in the dress, picking up the body smell blended with the scent of perfume. Not only her closeness, but seductive smell of her warm female body spiced with sweet perfume make the partner’s heart pound and his blood run faster. No doubt, many romances of those days started just like this, with a whisper of long dress, the a smell of young body, the sweet aroma of fragrances...

The word “pheromone” (from the Greek pherein — to transfer, and hormone — to excite) came from two entomologists, Peter Karlson and Martin Luscher. According to their definition, pheromone is a substance secreted outside by an individual and received by a second individual of the same species in which it releases a specific reaction. The word pheromone was accepted and quickly became quite popular not only among the scientists, but among the layperson as well. Pheromones of reptilians were discovered in the late 1960s; then came fish and mammalian pheromones. Recently evidence of the existence of human pheromones has emerged as well...

Given the importance of olfaction in all other species of animals, it is highly unlikely that we, humans are completely free of olfactory bonds. Animals use their noses to recognize their babies and the members of their group, to find the sexual partner and to evaluate each other, so humans may also do something similar. And why not speculate that odors play an important role in personal bonds formation? We kiss and hug our kids and lovers, and we dance so close to each other, allowing our bodies to work their magic. Is it coincidence that dancing, where partners stay close, when fast energetic sweat-producing movement follows by slow intimate dancing, and where the male so often lifts his arm and leads his dame by his armpit region giving her a reach opportunity to smell his pheromones, is so common in human culture? It is not so important whether we are reacting to some particular pheromone or to the complex mixture of individual odors — but what is important, is that the olfactory system, which sends signals directly to the subconscious brain, is the most probable cause of our feelings, emotions and desires."



Best Wishes
-Skin Biology

This message has been edited. Last edited by: SkinBiologyWebmaster,
Location: Singapore
Registered: 22 April 2006
Posts: 93
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there seem to be some problem with the article... the english translation part is gone...
Picture of Dr. Pickart
Location: Skin Biology
Registered: 15 September 2004
Posts: 7065
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We will look for it.
Picture of Skin Biology
Location: Skin Biology in Bellevue, Washington - USA
Registered: 22 June 2004
Posts: 4865
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Dear Private Ryan:

It seems to be working.

Thank you,
-Skin Biology

This message has been edited. Last edited by: SkinBiologyWebmaster,
Location: Singapore
Registered: 22 April 2006
Posts: 93
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skin biology, the lower part where there use to be the english translation is lost but only "English Translation</b" left...
Picture of Skin Biology
Location: Skin Biology in Bellevue, Washington - USA
Registered: 22 June 2004
Posts: 4865
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Dear Private Ryan:

I'm sorry I don't quite understand - It looks like the entire article in english is still there.
Location: Oakland, CA
Registered: 28 February 2006
Posts: 245
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The article makes total sense to me. I find that if I go without deodorant when I go out dancing, I get asked to dance at least 5 times more than if I'm wearing a commercial smell-masking product. Conversely, dabbing a bit of plant extract (like an essential oil) on my armpits doesn't seem to negatively impact my dance partners. I am convinced it's because "natural" scents don't seem to overwhelm the olfactory receptors the way a "synthetic" or artificial scent does.

I have long observed the smell of people's hair, lips, breath, etc. change profoundly when they have strong emotions or are positively aroused. The most arousing perfume in the world for me is my boyfriend's natural aroma. When we first got together I slowly weaned him off of all his artificially scented products. There are few things as disturbing (for me) as getting close to him and them being hit with a wall of artificial scent, blocking the way to that most delicate and personal of intimacies.

I have got to get around to ordering the Skin Bio body perfume sample kit. My whole natural perfumer klatch is curious.
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