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<Paula>
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I am taking a probiotic supplement now called Accuflora. Am hoping it not only helps with digestion but I have read it *might* be good for skin, nails, and help reduce redness, calm inflammation in the body, etc.

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Location: Skin Biology
Registered: 15 September 2004
Posts: 7065
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These are used for reducing allergies and inflammation.

My allergies just about vanished after I started ProBiotic yogurt.
<Paula>
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Great! Smiler I hope I have improvement too.
Location: Alaska
Registered: 19 October 2009
Posts: 29
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I eat probiotic yogurt daily and my allergies seem less severe
Picture of Dr. Pickart
Location: Skin Biology
Registered: 15 September 2004
Posts: 7065
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Probiotic
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Probiotics are live microorganisms thought to be healthy for the host organism. According to the currently adopted definition by FAO/WHO, probiotics are: "Live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host".[1] Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and bifidobacteria are the most common types of microbes used as probiotics; but certain yeasts and bacilli may also be helpful. Probiotics are commonly consumed as part of fermented foods with specially added active live cultures; such as in yogurt, soy yogurt, or as dietary supplements.

Etymologically, the term appears to be a composite of the Latin preposition pro ("for") and the Greek adjective βιωτικός (biotic), the latter deriving from the noun βίος (bios, "life").[2]
At the start of the 20th century, probiotics were thought to beneficially affect the host by improving its intestinal microbial balance, thus inhibiting pathogens and toxin producing bacteria [3]. Today, specific health effects are being investigated and documented including alleviation of chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases,[4] prevention and treatment of pathogen-induced diarrhea,[5] urogenital infections,[6] and atopic diseases.[7]

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Location: Eden Prairie (MN)
Registered: 07 February 2010
Posts: 474
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One of the best sources of probiotics is home made kefir (the industrial one is completely different as to the population of bacteria present).
With pills of probiotics, the bacteria you get may well be dead. In a live culture you are completely sure they are alive.
Yogurt gives transient benefits while kefir bacteria colonize the intestine.
Also, you can eat the kefir grains (bacteria and yeasts) as they multiply quickly, and they are extremely healthy. It is also economically convenient because you buy milk and you let the grains convert it into kefir (in about 24 hours). The culture is eternal as they don't die, they multiply and they keep going, making more and more kefir.

It takes a while to get used to the taste, which is acid and tart, but you can mix berries or other things to hide the taste a bit.
I have been making home made milk kefir for months and I drink it daily.

Here is a good published paper about the benefits of kefir:
Kefir : A symbiotic yeasts-bacteria community with alleged healthy capabilities
Authors: Ementeria et al.


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