Skin Biology    healthyskin.infopop.cc    Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  Products  Hop To Forums  Safer Sunlight for Better Health    PPD of RoC SPF 60 spray with Tinosorb M & S

Moderators: Rosy
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
PPD of RoC SPF 60 spray with Tinosorb M & S Login/Join
 
Location: Ontario
Registered: 05 August 2007
Posts: 3
posted   Reply With QuoteReport This Post  
Hello all,

This is my first post to this forum. I would like to thank you all of the participants for the great questions and information you have shared.

I have just bought my first sunscreen with Tinosorb M & S and have some questions I was hoping to get help with.

Full name: "RoC Minesol Ultra High Protection Suncare Spray SPF 60"

Medicinal Ingredients: Octinoxate (7.5%), Enzacamene (4%), Tinosorb M (2.5%), Tinosorb S (2%), Titanium Dioxide (1.1%)

Non-Medicinal Ingredients: Aqua, Butylene Gycol, PVP/Hexadecene Copolymer, C12-15 Alkyl Benzoate, Styrene/Acrylates Copolymer, Dimethicone, Glycerin, Cyclohexasiloxane, Hydrogenated Palm Glycerides Citrate, Cyclopentasiloxane, Carbomer, Xanathan Gum, PEG-100 Stearate, Glyceryl Stearate, Potassium Cetyl Phosphate, Cetyl Alcohol Stearic Acid, Aluminum Hydroxide, Decyl Glucoside, Caprylyl Glycol, Pentylene Glycol, Linseed Acid, Sodium Dodecylbenzenesulfonate, Disodium EDTA, Tocopherol, Sodium Hydroxide, Methylparaben, Ethylparaben, Propylparaben, Chlorphenesin, Phenoxyethanol.


Here are my questions:
1) Can someone help me determine its PPD rating?
2) How photo-stable is this sunscreen?
3) Does Tinosorb M/S (or other ingredients listed above) breakdown and enter the bloodstream like avobenzone and oxybenzone?

This message has been edited. Last edited by: newGirl,
Location: Canada
Registered: 12 May 2007
Posts: 5
posted   Hide PostReply With QuoteReport This Post  
I read that the PPD is around 10 or 11. I can't help you with the other questions because I don't know. Wink
Check out the skincare board on makeupalley.com. I am positive they will be able to answer your questions.

Brenda
Location: Ontario
Registered: 05 August 2007
Posts: 3
posted   Hide PostReply With QuoteReport This Post  
Hello Brenda, Thank you for your reply. I have searched the MUA boards as well. Many people there have the same question as I do but not a single qualified reply.

I really hope someone can help.
Location: Planet Earth
Registered: 17 February 2005
Posts: 2020
posted   Hide PostReply With QuoteReport This Post  
Hi newGirl,

No one can really answer your three questions because there is yet to be an accepted national testing standard here in the United States for measuring UVA filters as PPD rating is not a sufficient standard.

Photostability is potentially a problem with all UV filters especially with UV absorbers. Furthermore, the measured photostability can easily change due to manufacturing formulations and consumer use even with the same ingredients.

On the Actives: Octinoxate (7.5%), Enzacamene (4%), Tinosorb M (2.5%), Tinosorb S (2%), Titanium Dioxide (1.1%)

Octinoxate is a UVB absorber. It is not observed to be photostable with avobenzone but can be stabilized by added sunscreen ingredients or solvent used in varying degrees. Tinosorbs M seems to stabilize octinoxate. It has been suspected to be a possible endocrine disruptor.

Enzacamene is another uvb filter. It is a possible endocrine disruptor showing estrogenic effects and uterine growth in immature rodents and may cause hypothyroidism. It is approved for cosmetic use and non-food products by the European Union’s, Health Canada, and in Australia. It is not permitted in Japan or approved for use in the USA by the FDA.

Tinosorb M and Tinosorb S are hybrid chemical uv absorbers and reflectors manufactured by Ciba. The ingredients are under review and not approved by the FDA in needing at least five years of continuous use data in any country (about now).

Tinosorb M is a broad spectrum (uva/uvb) hybrid micorfine absorber and scatters. It’s an efficient UV-A absorber and SPF booster. It shows low photodegradation and stabilizes octinoxate. It is one of a few organic sunscreen actives that shows no estrogenic effects in vitro. It is not approved by the FDA but in the EU.

Tinosorb S is a broad spectrum uv absorber. It’s photostable and shows no estrogenic effects in vitro. It’s approved for use by the EU and other parts of the world.

All the above nano sunscreen ingredients do and can penetrate the skin as low as the dermis with some potential for local or systemic toxicity while most nano-particle titanium dioxide detected at most in the outer dead layer or stratum corneum of the skin. However, one Australia study in 2005 found human viable epidermal levels of sunscreens of five common sunscreen agents, including octinoxate, are too low to cause any significant toxicity to the underlying human keratinocytes. While Oxinoxate and Enzacamene may be possible endocrine disrupters, Tinosob M and S do not show estrogenic or androgenic activity.

On the other hand, some scientists also observed evidence and suggested that although sunscreens may prevent redness partly by UV absorption and partly by inhibition of the skin's inflammatory response, such sunscreens might promote instead of protect against melanoma. Therefore, keep in mind that while sunscreen use protects us somewhat from photoaging, sunburn, and some squamous-cell carcinoma of the skin, there is no conclusive evidence to suggest that topical use of sunscreen is preventive against basal-cell carcinoma and cutaneous melanoma. Do not rely solely on sunscreens for protection from UV radiation.
Location: Ontario
Registered: 05 August 2007
Posts: 3
posted   Hide PostReply With QuoteReport This Post  
JW,

Thank you very much for your thorough reply. I really appreciate your time and the details in your response. You have given me alot to think about.

I really am at my wits end trying to find a sunscreen that suits my skin type. I do not burn but really am looking for high UVA protection. I am prone to acne and use various prescription acne products that leave my skin very susceptible to the sun.

May I ask you, do you know of other sunscreens that contain Tinosorb M and Tinosorb S?
Location: Planet Earth
Registered: 17 February 2005
Posts: 2020
posted   Hide PostReply With QuoteReport This Post  
There are several, but I have not looked into all of them and as you shared with us previously, I would not only look at the active ingredients for UVA protection. Researching for documented photostability and relative reactivities of all active UV ingredients and chemical stabilizers and any tested product safety profile should be more important because you'll be using it daily and in large amount.
  Powered by Social Strata  
 

Skin Biology    healthyskin.infopop.cc    Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  Products  Hop To Forums  Safer Sunlight for Better Health    PPD of RoC SPF 60 spray with Tinosorb M & S